Archive for the ‘Money’ Category

Seven Cent Cotton Forty Cent Meat

Seven cent cotton forty sent meat
How in the world can a poor man eat
Pray for the sunshine cause it will rain
Things getting worse drivin all insane
Built a nice barn painted it brown
Lightening came along and burnt it down
No use talkin any man’s beat with
Seven cent cotton and forty cent meat
Seven cent cotton a carload of tax
The loads too heavy for our poor backs
We got a set of farmers we all know well
But there’s something wrong sure as hell
We all work hard we groan and sweat
Now we plum ruined and a blowed up set
No use talkin any mans beat with
Seven cent cotton and forty cent meat

No corn in the cob no chicks in the yard
No meat in the smokehouse no tubs full of lard
No cream in the pitcher no honey in the mug
No butter on the table and no lasses in the jug
Things to eat are always high
Everyone is selling no one will buy
We quit kickin the faults not our own
We just can’t reap where we have sown
Seven cent cotton and forty cent meat
keep gettin thinner cause we don’t eat
Tried to raise peas tried to raise beans
All we can raise is turnip greens
Folks always sick paw mus cough
Aint had no sugar since Ma dropped off
No use talkin any man’s beat with
Seven cent cotton and forty cent meat

Seven cent cotton and forty cent meat
How in the world can a poor man eat
Flour up high cotton down low
how in the world can we raise the dough
Our clothes worn our shoes run down
Old slouch had with a hole in the crown
Back nearly broken Fingers all wore
Cotton goin down to rise no more
Seven cent cotton and forty cent meat
Feels like a chain is on our feet
poor gettin poorer all around here
Kids coming regular every year
Plant corn was a wet year
Plant wheat and it turned a corn year
No use talkin any man’s beat with
Seven cent cotton and forty cent meat

Seven cent cotton and forty cent meat
Who in the devil has got a chance
We cant buy clothes we cant buy meat
Got too much cotton not enough to eat
Can’t help each other what shall we do
I can’t solve the problem so its up to you
Seven cent cotton and forty cent hose
Guess we will have to do with out our clothes
Seven cent cotton and forty cent meat
how in the world can a poor man eat
Mules in the barn and crops laid by
The [cubo] plum empty and the cows gone dry
Well waters low nearly out of sight
Can’t take a bath on a Saturday night
No use talkin any mans beat with
11 cent cotton and 40 c meat

Chicago Exhibition

One afternoon I thought I would go
To see the Great American show
Of which there was such a hallabou
Chicago Exhibition
I left a clerk to mind the store
A thing I had never done before
How long I would be I was not sure
But I thought it would take a week or more
So home i goes to my wife and I says
Business will take me away a few days
Tomorrow morning at six oclock
Im going to London (Landon?) to purchase stock
So call me at five for breakfast dear
And see my collars and shirts appear
Wrap them up so they will not crease
And pack them away in my new valise
When morning came it was pouring rain
I hustled around the cabin in vain
I tried to step on a passenger car
But I slipped and fell with an awful par
My new umbrella was knocked about
And turned completely inside out
But I wouldn’t a cared so much for that
If I hadn’t a tore my new silk hat
I also spoiled a suit of clothes
And tore the skin all of my nose
I fell in the mud on the broad of my back
My valise went flying across the truck
First it opened my collars and shirts
They went flying around the road in the dirt
When I got up I could hardly walk
But I managed to get down as far as the dock
The steamer was almost ready to go
In a minute or two the whistle blowed
I asked my ticket he answered No
Your not in a fit condition
Your a liar I roared as I jumped aboard
For Chicago Exhibition
And when I reached the famous fair
All kinds of people had gathered there
There was dutchmen with their sausage meat
And Italians playing out in the street
It was a dollar a piece for apple pies
They would do dam well for railraod ties
They had no fresh meat so they gave us a dish
Of slathery soup with turnip and fish
And after that great meal was done
I found that my watch and purse was gone
So up I jumped on the table quick
And I told the cashier that he would I thrash
If he didn’t immediately give me my cash
The table slipped and away I flew
And away went all the dishes too
A plate of soup my head went through
At Chicago Exhibition

** (Format leads to questions about this pieces status as song lyric)

Give My Love to Nellie Jack

Three years ago since Jack and Joe
Set sail across the foam
Each vowed his fortune he would make
Before returning home
In one short year Jack gained his wealth
And home he did set sail
And just before they shook hands to part
Poor Joe could only say

Give my love to Nellie Jack
And kiss her once for me
The sweetest girl in all this world
Im sure you’ll say is she
Treat her kindly Jack old pal
And tell her I am well
His parting words were don’t forget
To give my love to Nell

Two years have past and Joe at last
had gained enough for life
And he set sail across the sea
To make sweet Nell his wife
but when he reached his nature shore
A friend to
When on his way he heard them say
That Jack and Nell were wed
He now regrets between sales and [frets]
That he had ever said

When on the street they chanced to meet
Said Joe you selfish elf
The next girl that I learn to love
I”ll kiss her for myself
But all is fair in love they say so since you’ve gone and wed
I’ll not be angry Jack old pal
Once again he said

I Had But Fifty Cents

I took my girl to a fancy ball,
It was a social hop
But we stayed until the folks went out
And the music it did stop
Then to a restaurant we went
The best one in the street
She said she wasn’t hungry
But this is what she ate
A dozen raw, a plate of slaw
A chicken and a roast
Some sparrow grass and apple sauce
And soft shelled crabs on toast
A big hot stew and crackers too
Her appetite was immence
When she called for pie I thought I’d die
For I had but fifty cents

She said she wasn’t hungry
She didn’t care to eat
Now Ive got money in my clothes
To feed she can’t be beat
She took it in so cosy
She had an awful tank
She said she wasnt thristy
But this is what she drank
A whiskey shin, a glass of gin
It made me shake with fear
Some ginger pop, with rum on top
A schooner than of beer
A glass of ale, a gin cocktail
She aught to have more sense
When she called for more I fell on the floor
For I had but fifty cents

You bet I wasnt hungry
I didn’t care to eat
Expecting every moment
To be kicked out in the street
She said she’d bring her family round
Some day and we’re have fun
Then I gave the man the fifty cents
And this is what he done
He tore my clothes he smashed my nose
He hit me in the jaw
He gave me a prize of a pair of black eyes
And with me swept the floor
He took me where my clothes hung loose
And threw me over a fence
Take my advice don’t try twice
When youve got but fifty cents

In The Baggage Coach Ahead

On a dark and stormy night
A train rattled on
All the travelers had gone to bed
Except one young man with a babe in his arms
Who sat with a bowed down head

The innocent one began crying just then
As though its poor heart would break
An angry man said make that child stop its noise
For its keeping all of us awake

Put it out said another don’t keep it in here
Weve paid for our berth and our rest
But never a word said the man with the child
As he fondled it close to his breast

Where is its mother go take it to her
This a lady than softly said
I wish that I could was the mans sad reply
But she lies in the coach ahead

While the train rattled on a husband sat in tears
Thinking of the happy days of just a few short years
For baby face brings pictures of a cherished hope thats dead
But baby cries can’t wake her in the baggage coach ahead

Each eye filled up with tears as his story he told
Of a wife who was faithful and true
Of how he had saved all his earnings for years
Just to build up a home for two

How when heaven had sent this sweet little babe
Their young happy wives were blessed
His heart seemed to break
When he mentioned her name
And in tears tried to tell them the rest

Every woman arose to assist with the child
There were mothers and wives on the train
And soon was the little one sleeping in peace
With no thought of sorrow or pain

Next morn at the station he bade all good-bye
God Bless you he gratefully said
Each one had a story to tell their home
Of the baggage coach ahead

The Little Red Caboose Behind The Train

While riding on the Band 6 from Phillie to N.Y.
And meditating as the train rolled by some happy thoughts came back to me
I’ll mention them to you
The thoughts of when I was a railroad boy
And if you will but listen I will tell you of the fun
That we had in sunshine snow or rain
 We all would get together round the cosy little fire
In the little re caboose behind the train

At night when we’d lay down to sleep upon our humble cots
We would always sing some old familar strain
And the angels they watch over us as we lay fast asleep
In the little red caboose behind the train

I was flagman on the train and did my duty well
And always kept the signals in good trim
Especially the red lights they were always in their place
All polished up and brightened was the tin
We also used to cook our meals and eat aboard the train
When our friends would join us we’d get rasin cane
We always had a pantry and we kept in neat and clearn
In the little red caboose behind the train

The boys all knew when pay day came
They were wathing for the car
And when they saw it coming up the grade
They waited for their wages then all would go to town
But the first thing they would see their board was paid
Then what a time the boys all had drinking lemonade
They would spend their money freely more to gain
but when they’d got a small sized bun you would see them steering off
For the little red caboose behind the train

 

The Little Black Moustache

I met a charming boy one day
He love me dear as life
I thought the time would sure come
When I would be his wife
When I would be his wife
When I would be his wife
I thought the time would sure come
When I would be his wife

He called on me one rainy night
He stayed till almost three
He said he never loved a girl
As much as he loved me
As much as he loved me
As much as he loved me
He said he never loved a girl
As much as he loved me

He had money in the bank
And oh! he cut a dash
A diamond ring a watch and chain
A little black moustache
A little black moustache
A little black moustache
She had false teeth and false hair too
And forty five years old

And now they live next door to me
In a spacious mansion old
She married for that black moustache
He married for her gold
He married for her gold
He married for her gold
She married for that black moustache
He married for her gold

Now ladies please take my advice
Don’t ever be so rash
Just let these stylish chaps alone
With their little black moustache
Their little black moustache
Their little black moustache
Just let these stylish chaps alone
And their little black moustache

Kentucky Moonshiner

Ive been a moonshiner for 17 long years
Ive spent all my money for whiskey and beers
Ill go to some holler, I’ll put up my still
I’ll make you one gallon for a two dollar bill

I’ll go to some grocery, and drink with my friends
No women to follow to see what I spends
God bless those pretty women I wish they were mine
Their breath smells as sweet as dew on the vine

I’ll eat when am hungry and drink when am dry
If moonshine don’t kill me I’ll live till I die
God bless those moonshiners I wish they were mine
Their breath smells as sweet as the good old moonshine

Frankie and Johnny

Frankie and Johnny were lovers
OH lordy how they could love
Swore to be true to each other
True as the stars above
He was her man but we done her wrong so wrong

Johnny’s mother told him
And she was mighty nice
Don’t spend Frankie’s money
On that parlor Ann Eliz
Your Frankie’s man and your doin her wrong so wrong

Frankie and Johnny were walking
Johnny in his brand new suit
Oh good lawd says Frankie
Dont my Johnny look cute
He was her man but he done her wrong so wrong

Stern Old Bachelor

I am a stern old bachelor
My age is forty-four
I do declare I’ll never live
With women any more

Little sod shanty
Sod shanty give to me
For Im a stern old bachelor
From matrimony free

I have a stove that’s worth ten cents
a table worth fifteen
I cook my grub in oyster cans
and keep all things so clean

When I come home late I have no fear
I smile and walk right in
I never hear a voice yell out
I say where have you been

On winters cold and story night
In my cosy little shack
I sing my song and smoke my pipe
With no one to talk back

And when I go to bed alone
My snores cause no alarm
I never have to walk aboard
With an infant on each arm

I go to bed when’er I please
I get up just the same
I change my socks three times a year
With no one to complain

And when I die and go to heaven
Which all old bachelors do
I’ll never have to grivince for fear
The wife don’t get there too